Relaunching The Boy Wonder Press Podcast and Blogsite!!!

Hello everyone!

It has been awhile since I have blogged on this site but, it was due to doing a lot of meditating. Right now,  I realized that I want to have fun by doing what I love and that is writing and talking about comic books. That’s right peeps, I am going to be relaunching the Boy Wonder Press!

What inspired me to relaunch my site is my current stint on the DC Comics Geeks Nation Podcast (Not affiliated with DC Comics). I currently host the Flashcast where I discuss everything related to the Flash including the comics and the CW Network TV Series. As I did more segments, I realize that there is so much more to write and talk about when it comes to comics and geekdom. The late Will Eisner, the creator of The Spirit, and writer J. Michael Straczynski, inspired me to revamp the Boy Wonder Press.  In addition the Boy Wonder Press relaunching, I will still be doing the Flashcast and DC Discussion on Geeks Nation Podcast.

In the Boy Wonder Press, I will be doing written and audio comic book reviews. I will also provide honest and objective commentary on the news surrounding all things related to DC, Marvel, Image, TV shows, and anime.

Commentating on comics and all thing geek is so fun. Analyzing characters whether heroic or villainous is pure joy. Comparing the unique worlds to ours is an awesome and sobering experience. Whenever I delve into any topic I talk about, I always learn something new and that is a really cool experience. I have the Creative Writing department at UC Riverside and an AP English teacher at high school to credit for helping me develop my penchant for learning from reading an analyzing the stories and characters. I am looking forward to doing more of this on the Boy Wonder Press and also the DC Comics Geeks Nation.

You can find me on WordPress, Youtube, Anchor, and Podbean. Very soon, I will be launching my Patreon account and many other accounts.

I am excited for this new chapter in my life and looking forward to sharing it with you, constant readers and listeners alike! Until then and as I always say….

Stay ever so awesome!

-Brian reporting from the Boy Wonder Press on Earth-16

Review: Age of Rebellion: Han Solo – Running from the Rebellion

Writer: Greg Pak

Artist: Chris Sprouse

Inks: Karl Story

Color: Tamra Bonvillain

Han Solo has been my favorite Star Wars character since I was 10 years old. My first Star Wars action figure was a Han Solo with a Jabba the Hutt figure that my dad bought me. Right now, I have a Han Solo action figure  in Hoth gear sitting on my shelf at my office.  Years ago, my mom and sister bought me several Han Solo books for Christmas and I bought a Han Solo comic. And a year ago, I saw Solo: A Star Wars Story which I thought was a really cool film (unpopular opinion to some fans). Han Solo is basically in my Mount Rushmore of favorite superheroes next to Batman, Superman, Captain America, and Robin (Damian Wayne).  So, it is no surprise to myself that I bought the Han Solo Age of Rebellion comic. Because I am a fan and I wanted to see the Star Wars Universe through the eyes of our favorite smuggler once more. And in this issue of Age of Rebellion, we get just that.

The story starts of almost immediately after the Battle of Yavin where Han and Chewbacca are counting the money the 17,000 credits they have earned. Han tells Chewie that they could pay off Jabba and make much needed repairs to the Millennium Falcon.

Before any plans could be made, Han and Chewie’s plans are cut short when the farmboy turned Rebel Alliance hero Luke Skywalker asks Han for a favor to smuggle goods to a planet that the Rebel Alliance is using as an outpost. Han, as always, is reluctant but eventually goes along with the request after much convincing from Chewie.

During this time, Solo runs into a group of old smuggling friends after breaking up a fight between them and a group of Rebel soldiers. The smugglers poke fun at Solo for being a Rebel much to his ire.

However, Akko, Han’s old friend, offers to do a smuggling job to get some money on another planet. Han accepts but things go south when one of the smugglers inadvertently gets the attention of an Imperial patrol.

Fortunately, Han saves his friends from the Imperials by emptying his ship of everything including the supplies and money. Han and Akko’s group part on good terms and Han returns to the place where he dropped the Rebel supplies. Han thanks the planet’s locals for looking out for the supplies but they want Han’s credits in return which the smuggler reluctantly relinquishes. It is here we find out why Han was not able to pay back his debt to Jabba the Hutt. Han Solo AOR

At the end of the comic, Han delivers the supplies to the Rebels on the outpost planet. The Rebels thank Han and call him a hero. Despite Han reminding the Rebels that he is not one of them, they ask the Corellian yet for another favor. And as a result, Han takes on another job while verbally declaring that it would be the last time he does any favors for the Rebel Alliance.

Greg Pak does an awesome job of writing Han Solo as this reluctant member of the Rebel Alliance to Restore the Republic. I think a better term for Han Solo in this comic would be a Rebel-by-accident. After all, he was pulled into a fight against an evil Empire by a certain old hermit and a blonde haired farmboy. I also liked how Pak brilliantly writes Han hilariously denying that he is a Rebel to Rebels and smugglers alike. I feel that Pak took shades of both the Harrison Ford and Alden Eherenreich versions of Han Solo as he wrote this issue. We see the far more cynical Han Solo portrayed by Harrison Ford when he argues with Chewie and denies his Rebel affiliation. But we also see Alden Ehrenreich’s Solo when Han retrieves the Rebel supplies and willingly delivers them to the Rebels. The scene where Solo meets the Rebels on Calumdarian, the outpost planet, reminded me of the scene where young Han gives the coaxium to Enfys Nest. In both scenes, Han is seen as having a heart despite his gruff and cynical exterior.

I also thought the art and coloring done by Chris Sprouse, Karl Story, and Tamra Bonvillain was great. They drew Han Solo exactly like he was in A New Hope along with the rest of the characters. The colors done by Sprouse gave this story a Western feel with almost all the scenes having a sunset or dusk setting. The shade tells me that something shrewd is about to go down and knowing Han Solo, he is all about being shrewd. We even see this in the ending scene with the relieved Rebels. Han just goes back to what he has always been doing: smuggling while being a reluctant Rebel as he flies the Falcon though the crimson and dusky skies of Calumdarian.

Having said all of this, the only thing I would have liked to see in this comic was Han’s interaction with Princess Leia. Whenever Han and Leia argue, there is always bound to be fireworks or at least shots fired. Leia was only referenced by Han as asking him for a favor for a job. I felt that Leia would have been likely the one to grab Han’s ear to get him to do a job for the Rebellion rather than just Luke alone because, even if Han didn’t want to admit it, Leia was one of the reasons why he stayed with the Rebellion. Luke was a reason but it was that princess from Alderaan that slowly made Han forget about paying Jabba for the moment and help the Rebels anyway he could.

Or another suggestion would have been to have almost all the characters from Leia to C-3PO or General Jan Dodonna asking Han for favors much to the annoyance of our friendly neighborhood smuggler. That would have made this comic even more awesome and would have exposed Han’s true character through his gruff exterior.

Otherwise, I enjoyed this story. Even if you’re not a Han Solo fan, you cannot help but see how Han starts to grow from cynical smuggler to hero of the Rebel Alliance. Any you know…it’s Han Solo.

 

Rating: 4.3/5